TUESDAY, Nov. 9, 1819

The senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Mr. Moore presented the petition of Thomas Johnson, praying the passage of a law authorizing him to manumit his negro slave Martin.

Ordered that said petition be referred to a select committee, to consist of five whereupon Messrs, Moore Garth, Harwell, Trotter and Metcalf were appointed.

Mr. Garth called for the order of the day, on a bill to authorize the administratrix and administrator of Daniel W. Michaux deceased, to sell certain real estate therein named.

On motion, ordered that said bill be committed to committee of the whole, and made the order of the day on to-morrow.


53

A bill to establish the town of Triena and incorporate the trustees, was called up and read the second time.

On motion ordered that said bill be engrossed for a third reading and made the order of the day on to-morrow.

The order of the day on a bill to prevent the practice of duelling was called up, and on motion ordered to be referred to a select committee, whereupon messrs. Farmer, Terrell and Ringgold were appointed.

Mr.. Hodges called for the order of the day on a bill to authorize Alle Kyle to make title to a certain tract of land, which was read and on motion ordered to be engrossed for a third reading on to-morrow

The order of the day on a bill to authorize William Russell, sen., and Joshua Gocher to sell certain lands therein mentioned, was called up, and on motion ordered to be committed to committee of the whole and made the order of the day on to-morrow.

On motion of Mr. Farmer, the resolution which had been laid on the table proposing to appoint an additional clerk, was taken up and on motion of Mr. Moore amended to read as follows, to-wit: Resolved, that it is expedient to appoint an assistant secretary to the senate of the state of Alabama, during the present session of Assembly, and that the senate will proceed to this election of said assistant secretary on Thursday next.

On motion, Mr. Terrell was added to the committee on Salt Springs.

Mr. Metcalf asked for and obtained leave to introduce a bill to provide for the establishment of the seat of justice in Franklin county, which was read the first time.

On motion, ordered that said bill be read a second time and made the order of the day for Thursday next.

A message from the house of representatives by messrs. Davis and Saffold:

Mr. President, the house of representatives concur in the amendments by you made to the resolution ap-


54

probating the conduct of major gen. Andrew Jackson and have appointed messrs Lampkin and Everett to act with such members as may be appointed by the senate.

On motion messrs. Farmer, Rose and Garth were appointed.

Mr. Moore from the committee on enrolled bills, reported an act prescribing the manner in which the oath of office shall be administered to the Governor of this state, and certain other officers therein named, as truly enrolled which was signed by the President.

On motion of Mr. Moore the committee of the whole was discharged from the consideration of a bill to repeal certain laws therein named.

On motion of Mr. Moore, ordered, that said bill be considered as engrossed and read the third time forthwith. Said bill was then read the third time and passed. - Ordered that the secretary acquaint the house of representatives therewith.

Mr. Moore from the committee of enrolled bills reported that the committee had presented to His Excellency the Governor for his approval the enrolled bill prescribing the manner in which the oath of office shall be administered to the Governor of this state and certain other officers therein named.

A message from his excellency the Governor by H. Hitchcock, Esq. secretary of state - Mr.. President,

His excellency the Governor has instructed me to inform you that he has this day approved an act prescribing the manner in which the oath of office shall be administered to the Governor of this state, and certain other officers therein named.

On motion of Mr. Casey, resolved, that a committee be appointed to join such committee as may be appointed by the representative branch, to wait on his excellency the Governor and inform him that both branches will convene in the representatives chamber to administer the oath of office forthwith- whereupon messrs Casey, Chambers and Sims were appointed.


55

Ordered that the secretary acquaint the house therewith.

A message from the house of representatives by Mr. Everett:

Mr. President - The house of representatives have concurred in the resolution appointing a joint committee to wait on his excellency the Governor and inform him that both houses will forthwith convene in the representative chamber in order to administer the oath of office to him, and that they have appointed on their part for that purpose messrs. Davis and Saffold.

I am also instructed to inform you, that the House of Representatives are now ready to receive you in the representative hall for that purpose.

Whereupon the members of the Senate repaired to the hall of the House of Representatives and having taken their seats, His Excellency WILLIAM W. BIBB, Governor, appeared and Mr. Speaker administered to him the oath of office, prescribed by the Constitution of this state. After which, His Excellency the Governor arose and addressed both Houses as follows, to-wit:

Gentlemen, - I avail myself of this occasion, to express my acknowledgements for the proof which has been afforded me, of the public confidence. Called by the voice of our fellow citizens to the chief magistracy of the state, I proceed to the station, with a full conviction of its high responsibility and with a sincere desire to promote the welfare of the country, and the happiness of the people.

We have entered on the exercise of the rights of self government and I am persuaded, that no one has stronger inducements to rejoice, at the change in our political condition, than the individual who now addresses you. A territorial government can never be acceptable to any portion of the American community; and such is the nature and extent of the powers delegated to the Executive, that his acts are always viewed with suspicion and jealousy. His best deeds are seldom correctly estimated; and his unintentional errors are often ascribed to unworthy motives.


56

Happily for all concerned, these sources of collision and distrust are now removed, and we behold the gratifying spectacle of the representatives of a free people, erecting and establishing the Temple of Liberty.

United to the great family of its American States; possessing simple resources for the advancement of learning and the diffusion of knowledge; blessed with a country, abounding in navigable waters and rich in the advantages of soil and climate, we surely cannot contemplate the high destiny which awaits us, without sentiments of profound gratitude and without a firm determination to cherish and support the government of our choice, under which alone such distinguished blessings can be enjoyed.

On my part, I solemnly declare, that my best exertions shall be devoted, to the promotion of virtue and intelligence, the only sure basis of all free institutions; to the encouragement of obedience to the laws; to the cultivation of harmony, and good will among ourselves and with the public functionaries of our sister states, and of the United States; to the improvement of those natural advantages with which we are so bountifully supplied; and to the accomplishment of every object, which according to my deliberate judgment, may tend to elevate the character of our state, and to establish its true and permanent interests.

Whereupon His Excellency retired, and the members of the Senate returned to their own chamber, and Mr. President resumed the chair.

On motion the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning 10 o'clock.