THURSDAY, Dec. 16, 1819.

The senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Message from the house of representatives by Mr. Lamkin;

Mr. President and gentlemen of the senate, The house of representatives have passed on its third reading a bill supplemental to the act passed by both hous-


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es of the General Assembly during their present session, entitled "An act to provide for the organizing and disciplining the militia of the State of Alabama" -- to which they desire your concurrence -- also a bill to authorise the holding an election, therein named -- to which they likewise desire your concurrence; and a bill making appropriations for certain persons therein named; to which they request the concurrence of your honorable body.

The bill supplemental to the act passed by both houses of the General Assembly during their present session entitled "An act to provide for organizing and disciplining the militia of the state of Alabama" was then taken up and read the first time. On motion ordered, that the rule which requires all bills to be read on three several days be dispensed with, and that said bill be read the second time forthwith.

Said bill was accordingly read the second time; and on motion ordered, to lie on the table.

A bill to regulate the rate of interest was called for; and on motion of Mr. Moore, the senate resolved itself into committee of the whole thereon, Mr. Watkins in the chair and after some time spent therein, the committee rose, Mr. President resumed the chair, and Mr. Watkins reported that said committee had according to order, had said bill under consideration, and that they had made sundry amendments therein, and was instructed to report the same as amended. The question being put on agreeing to said amendments, it was decided in the affirmative; yeas and nays being called for on said question, they were as follow yea. 14, nay. 4.

Those who voted in the affirmative are messrs. President, Chambers, Conner, Farmer, Garth, Gause, Harwell, Hogg, Metcalfe, Ringgold, Terrell, Trotter, Watkins and Seabury.

Those who voted in the negative are messrs. Hanby, Hodges, Moore and Rose. Said bill as amended was then read the third time and passed.

Ordered, that the title of said bill be an act, to regu-


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late the rate of interest. Ordered, that the secretary acquaint the house of representatives thereof.

Message from the house of representatives by Mr. Davis-- Mr. President and gentlemen of the senate: The house of representatives have read a third time and passed "An act to incorporate the city of Mobile, which originated in your honorable body.

Mr. Garth moved, that Mr. Hanby the senator from Blount county, have leave of absence during the remainder of the present session of the General Assembly: which leave was granted.

On motion of Mr. Garth, a bill supplemental to an act providing for the organization of the militia of this state, was taken up and amended. On motion ordered, that the rule which requires all bills to be read on three several days be dispensed with, and that said bill be read the third time forthwith. Said bill was then read as amended, and passed.

Ordered, that the title of said bill be "an act supplementary to an act to regulate the proceedings of the courts of law and equity in this state."

Ordered, that the secretary acquaint the house of representatives therewith.

On motion of Mr. Garth, the committee of the whole was discharged from the consideration of a bill to authorise justices of the peace to receive the acknowledgment and probate of deeds and relinquishment of dower. Said bill was then read the third time and passed.

On motion ordered, that the title of said bill be "an act to authorise justices of the peace to receive the acknowledgment and probate of deeds and relinquishment of dower."

Ordered, that the secretary acquaint the house of representatives thereof.

The amendment made by adding an additional section by the house of representatives to an act to prevent frauds and fraudulent combinations in the sale of public lands in this state was taken up and read; and on motion was concurred in, the yeas and nays being called


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for on said question, the were as follows, yea. 10, nay. 6.

Those who voted in the affirmative are messrs. Chambers, Conner, Garth, Hanby, Harwell, Hogg, Metcalf, Ringgold, Rose and Terrell.

Those who voted in the negative are messrs. President, Farmer, Hodges, Moore, Trotter and Seabury.

On motion, the committee of the whole was discharged from the consideration of a bill to amend the several laws concerning the trial of slaves.

Said bill was taken up and amended -- it was then read the third time as amended and passed.

On motion ordered, that the committee of the whole be discharged form the following, a bill to amend the several laws relating to assessors and tax collectors, and a bill relating to licences to tavern keepers, hawkers and pedlars; which bills were taken and severally read the third time and passed.

Ordered, that the secretary acquaint the house of representatives thereof.

Mr. Moore from the committee on enrolled bills, reported that said committee has examined the following acts, and found them duly enrolled to-wit :

An act to establish a certain road therein named.

An act to authorise the administratrix and administrator of James Hartgrove deceased, to sell a certain quarter section of land.

An act to raise a revenue, for the support of government for the year 1820.

An act to regulate elections establish certain precincts in the counties therein named, and for other purposes.

An act appointing additional commissioners for the town of Huntsville.

An act for the relief of Rebecca Ann Bondurant.

An act for the encouragement of killing and destroying of wolves and panthers.

An act for the relief of Lucretia Stammers.

An act to alter and amend the laws regulating the admission and practice of counsellors and attornies at law.


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A resolution authorizing Daniel Rather to sell certain public property therein named.

All of which acts and resolutions were accordingly signed by the President.

A bill to provide for the compensation of the members of the General Assembly, and others was taken up and read the second tome.

Ordered, that the rule which requires all bills to be read on 3 several days be dispensed with, and that said bill be read the second time forthwith. Said bill was then read the second time and amended -- whereupon it was read the third time as amended and passed.

Mr. Moore from the committee on enrolled bills, reported that the committee had presented to his Excellency the Governor, for his approval and signature the following: An act to establish a certain road therein named.

An act to authorise the administratrix and administrator of James Hartgrove deceased to sell a quarter section of land.

An act to raise a revenue for the support of government for the year 1820.

An act to regulate elections, establish certain precincts in the counties therein named, and for other purposes.

An act appointing additional commissioners for the town of Huntsville.

An act for the relief of Rebecca Ann Bondurant.

An act for the encouragement of killing and destroying of wolves and panthers.

An act for the relief of Lucretia Stammers.

An act to alter and amend the laws respecting the admission and practice of counsellors and attornies at law. A resolution authorizing Daniel Rather to sell certain public property therein named.

The senate proceeded to the consideration of the following memorial and accompanying resolution sent from the house of representatives to-wit:

To the senate and house of representatives of the con-


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gress of the United States; the general assembly of the state of Alabama, respectfully represent, that after the close of a glorious and successful war, on the part of this country against Great Britain, the establishment of a general peace in Europe, and the consequent revival of commerce throughout the world, cotton the staple article of this state, rose to a very high price and obtained ready sale in the European markets, at the same period the country was inundated with the notes of various state banks, and a very large amount of Mississippi stock, which by law had been made receivable in payment for public land in the state of Mississippi and the then territory of Alabama, was also in circulation and obtainable upon easy and accommodating terms to purchasers amidst circumstances so propitious for the United States, and unfortunate for the citizens of the infant state, was a portion of the public land, within our limits, offered for sale by the government to the highest bidder; attracted by the fertility of our soil, and stimulated by the desire of participating in the great profits, which the growing of cotton promoted to the planter, people from almost every state in the union thronged the public sales, loaded with bank notes and Mississippi stock. The consequences were such as the circumstances were naturally calculated to produce. The land sold for high and extravagant prices, and an immense debt is now owing by the citizens to the government of the United States. The untried results of a general peace have baffled the calculations of the most prudent and sagacious merchants in the world -- a general derangement of the money system has taken place, commerce has languished, our staple commodity has fallen to less than half the price it maintained at the time of those sales. Many of the state banks then in high credit, have since entirely failed, and others to protect themselves against a similar fate, have been compelled to curtail their discounts and call in their notes from circulation; even the bank of the United States, which promised in its commencement a sound


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and safe circulation, and an equality of exchange has also been constrained to diminish the circulation of its notes until they are as scarce as gold and silver, which we rarely see, the metal currency of the country is locked up in the vaults of the banks, and the community is left without a currency sufficient for the ordinary purposes of trade; in addition to all these circumstances, it is expected that your honourable body will at the present session of congress change the mode of selling the public land by reducing the minimum price, and requiring the whole purchase money to be paid in advance; although such a law may be wise and politic, it must have the effect of producing great inequality between those who have heretofore purchased under so many disadvantages, and those who may hereafter purchase under circumstances so favourable. Believing as your memorialists do, that it cannot be the policy of the U. States to exact from her citizens such forfeitures or to enforce to the full extent, contracts made under cirucmstances altogether favourable to the government and unfavourable to the citizen, and believing also, the interest of the government would not be subserved by such a policy, they therefore, respectfully pray, that a law may be passed by your honourable body, extending such relief to the purchasers of public land in this state, as you in your wisdom may think most adviseable.

Resolved, by the senate and house of representatives of the state of Alabama in general assembly convened, that the governor of this state be, and he is hereby requested to forward one copy of the foregoing memorial, to each of our senators, and one copy to our representative in the congress of the United States, with a request that they will exert themselves to procure such relief to the purchasers of public lands in this state, as the wisdom of the congress of the United States, may think proper to grant.

Which memorial and resolution were read the first time.

On motion, ordered that the rule which requires all


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memorials and resolutions to be read on three several days, be dispensed with, and that the said memorial and resolution be read the second time forthwith.

The same was accordingly read the second time, and,

On motion of Mr. Rose, the house resolved itself into committee of the whole, thereon, Mr. Moore in the chair, and after some time spent therein, the committee rose, Mr. President resumed the chair and Mr. Moore reported that the committee had according to order had the said memorial, with accompanying resolution under consideration, had made the following amendments thereto: "the general assembly of the state of Alabama further represents, that great inconvenience arises to a large portion of the citizens of this state, from the circumstance of there being but one port of entry and delivery within the state. They therefore pray your hounourable body, that a law may be passed constituting the port of Blakely a port of entry of delivery"; and instructed him to report the same as amended.

Which amendment was concurred. in.

On motion of Mr. Rose, said memorial and resolution were indefinitely postponed.

And on the question, the yeas and nays being called for, it was decided in the affirmative, yeas 11, nays 7.

Those who voted in the affirmative are, Messrs. Chambers, Conner, Farmer, Hanby, Hogg, Moore, Ringgold, Rose, Terrell, Watkins and Ware.

Those who voted in the negative, are messrs. President, Garth, Gause, Hodges, Metcalfe, Trotter and Seabury.

A message from the house of representatives, by Mr. Dillahunty: Mr. President and gentlemen of the senate - The House of representatives have passed, the following resolution: Resolved, that both houses of the general assembly, will adjourn sine die, at ten o'clock, on Friday the 17th instant, to which they desire the concurrence of the senate.


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Message from the house of representatives, by Mr. Walker. The house of representatives propose to amend the amendment of the senate, (to a bill to provide for the compensation of the members of the general assembly and others) by striking out eight hundred and seventy five (the pay of attorney general) to insert the word seven hundred and fifty, to which they desire the concurrence of the senate.

Message from the house of representatives, by Mr. Weedon: Mr. President and gentlemen of the senate, the house of representatives have passed an act, supplemental to an act, regulating the proceedings of the courts of law and equity, passed the present session of the general assembly.

Also, they disagree to the amendment proposed by the senate, to an act to amend the several acts concerning the trial of slaves.

Also, they agree to the first amendment and disagree to the last amendment proposed by the senate, to the act to regulate the rate of interest.

Also, they agree to your amendment, to the act relating to licences granted, to tavern keepers, hawkers and pedlars.

Also, they agree to the amendments proposed by you to an act supplementary to an act, passed by both houses of the general assembly, during their present session, entitled an act to provide for organizing and disciplining the militia of the state of Alabama. And an act, entitled an act, to regulate the proceedings of the courts of law and equity in this state.

Said bills with their amendments were ordered to lie on the table.

Mr. Moore from the committee on enrolled bills, reported that said committee had examined the following acts, and found them duly enrolled, viz.

An act to amend the several acts concerning ferries,

An act to suppress duelling, and


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An act establishing and regulating patrols.

An act for appropriating monies for certain persons therein named, was taken up and read the first time.

On motion, ordered that the rules which require all bills to be read on three several days be dispensed with, and that said bill be read a second time forthwith.

Said bill was accordingly read the second time, and the house proceeded to amend the same, when on motion for adjournment, this and the other orders of the day were postponed.

The senate adjourned until to-morrow morning, at 10 o'clock.