Tuesday, November 25.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Mr. Bibb, from the committee on propositions and grievances, to whom was referred so much of the Governor's Message as relates

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to the introduction of slaves into this state for the purpose of traffic reported a bill, to be entitled, an act to lay a tax on slaves introduced into this state for the purpose of sale or traffic; which was read the first time. Ordered, That said bill be made the order of the day for a second reading on to-morrow.

Mr. Bibb, from the same committee, to whom was referred the petition of Thomas C. Jones, reported a bill, to be entitled an act for the relief of Thomas C. Jones; which was read the first time and ordered to be read the second time on to-morrow:

Mr. Casey, from the select committee to whom was referred the resolution for the relief of William Peacock, reported a resolution extending the time of payment for lots in the town of Cahawba; which was read the first time, and ordered to be read the second time on to-morrow.

Mr. Bibb obtained leave to introduce a bill, to be entitled an act to alter and amend an act, entitled "An act to revise, consolidate and amend the several acts relative to the militia of this state," passed at Cahawba on the 31st December, 1822: which was read, and ordered to be read the second time on to-morrow.

On motion of Mr. McVay, Resolved, That the military committee be instructed to inquire into the expediency of compelling by law, militia officers to live within the bounds of their respective commands.

Mr. Bibb obtained leave to introduce a bill, to be entitled an act pointing out the mode of selecting grand jurors; which was read the first time, and ordered to be read the second time on to-morrow.

A bill to be entitled an act to amend an act, entitled "An act to establish a public road from the house of John Gandie in Morgan county, to Baltimore in Blount county," passed December 23, 1822" was read the second time, and ordered to be engrossed for a third reading on to-morrow.

Mr. McCamy offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That a committee be appointed to inquire into the propriety of repealing a law now in force, requiring a declaration to be filed on notes of hand or bonds in any of the courts of justice in this state, unless the plaintiff chooses to do so; but that the note or bond shall stand as a declaration for itself --- with leave to report by bill or otherwise: Whereupon, Messrs. McCamy, Powell and McVay, were appointed said committee.

Mr. Powell, from the committee appointed to wait on the Governor, and request a copy of his inaugural address, for the purpose of having it spread upon the journal, reported that the committee had performed that duty and that his Excellency had furnished a copy --- which is as follows:

Fellow-Citizens ---  In renewing my obligation of fidelity to the trust again so indulgently confided to me by my fellow citizens, it would be unjust to my feelings to omit this occasion of expressing the grateful sentiments that inspire me. So far as this liberal and repeated token of the public confidence is to be regarded as an estimation of past services, its value is enhanced: and the more so, when it is considered that this estimation was subjected to many counterbalancing impressions of local policy and interest.  Impressions which, however honestly entertained, I have the confidence to believe will appear on a review to be erroneously applied. It has ever been my earnest wish, that in determining on those delicate


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topics that have been viewed as grounds of sectional difference, the most liberal and harmonizing policy should pervade all portions of our enlightened population; and that a spirit of tolerance should attempter those variances of political sentiment which to some extent exist and which seem almost inseparable from free government itself.

These are the generous grounds on which we are to expect our public institutions to be so founded and conducted as to reflect either credit or usefulness on the state.  On these grounds our public stations may be filed according to the fair criterion of merit --- calling into active co-operation all the useful elements of which our community is composed, and thus producing the greatest possible momentum of political power and utility.

In maintaining this elevated ground of state policy, I trust that nothing within the sphere of my official powers will be found wanting. All my recollections as connected with the history of the state, and all the influences of which I am susceptible, tend in that direction.  Having been a member, however humble, of that body which established Alabama as a territory, and also of that which formed the outlines of its government as a state; having continued, moreover, to receive the unmerited kindness of this virtuous and intelligent people, my warmest sympathies as well as my highest prosperity of our rising commonwealth. It will ever be the subject of my highest admiration to see it emulating even the proudest of its sister republics, in the purity and reputation of its civil and literary institutions.

As respects any incentives of popular favor, I am too sensible of the diversity of sentiment, and perhaps of interest too, attending the present difficult stage of our history, to entertain a hope so vain, as that general approbation will be consequent upon any course of public policy I can pursue: such a result, however gratifying, must await a more propitious era.

This being the last period for which I am constitutionally eligible, and anticipating beyond it no further extension of my public life, the highest point to which my ambition can aspire is, that from which the retrospect will furnish a conscious pride of having faithfully and independently discharged my public duty.

The salutary principle in our Constitution, ensuring in this instance a rotation in office, will soon afford to the people of the state the opportunity of substituting, in this station, more approved abilities. Whatever errors our public administration may present, under whatever changes it may pass, there will remain one consolatory reflection, that a preserving principle will ever be found in an enlightened public sentiment.  And it is my firm hope, as it will be my lasting prayer, that this sentiment may continue to be illuminated by that divinity which has hitherto propitiated our destinies, perpetuating through the vicissitudes of future time the substantial happiness of our people, and the liberty and glory of our country.

A bill, to be entitled an act to provide for taking the census, was read the second time, and ordered to lie on the table.

Mr. Smith, from the special committee, to whom was referred the resolution requiring the secretary of state to furnish the solicitor of each judicial circuit with the names of the sheriffs who have failed to make return of the election for Governor, reported a bill, to be entitled, an act prescribing the mode by which sheriffs who are delinquent in making returns of the election for Governor shall be brought to justice; which was read the first time, and ordered to be read the second time on to-morrow.


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A bill, to be entitled an act restricting the recovery of claims against the counties respectively in certain cases, was read the second time, and ordered to be engrossed for a third reading on to-morrow.

An engrossed bill to be entitled an act declaring Cotaco, in Morgan county, a public highway, was read the third time and passed. Ordered, That the title of said bill be, an act, &c. --- and that the same be sent to the House of Representatives for their concurrence.

On motion of Mr. McVay, Resolved, That the military committee be instructed to inquire whether any, and if any, what amendment is necessary to be made to the patrol law; with leave to report by bill or otherwise.

On motion of Mr. Powell, Resolved, That the judiciary committee be instructed to examine into the propriety of passing a law authorizing sheriffs and coroners to leave correct copies of writs at the usual places of residence of defendants, in cases where bail is not required in certain cases, as sufficient service thereof, and report thereon.

Mr. Shackleford, from the committee appointed on the part of the Senate, to act conjointly with the committee appointed on the part of the House of Representatives, to examine into the situation of the state arsenal and the public arms contained therein, reported than they had performed that duty; that the arsenal is dry and in good order, and that there are eleven stand of arms in tolerably good order; that there are twenty-two stand of arms very much damaged and injured by the rust.  They recommend, that the quarter-master general be instructed to have them cleaned, and to repair such as can be rendered serviceable.

And then the Senate adjourned till to-morrow morning at 10 o’clock.