SECOND DAY.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA,

January 8th, 1861.

The Convention met at 10 o’clock, a. m., and was opened with prayer by Rev. A. G. Brewer.

Mr. Yancey from the committee, to wait on Hon. A. P. Calhoun, commissioner from South Carolina, reported that the committee had performed that duty, and that Mr. Calhoun was ready to address the Convention at such time as it should desire.

On motion by Mr. Jones, of Lauderdale, it was

Resolved, That the Hon. A. P. Calhoun, commissioner from the State of South Carolina to the State of Alabama, be requested to address the Convention at this time and make such communications as he may desire.

Hon. A. P. Calhoun was then introduced to the Convention, and addressed it relative to the object of his mission, and presented certain documents with reference thereto.

Mr. Yancey moved that these documents be received and spread upon the Journals for the information of the Convention. Adopted.

APPENDIX A.

Mr. Watts placed the following dispatches before the Convention, received from Gov. Moore:

Received at Montgomery, January 8th, 1861, by telegraph from Washington, 7th, To Gov. Moore. The republicans in the house to-day, refused to consider the border States’ compromise-complimented Major Anderson, and pledged to sustain the President.

MOORE & CLOPTON.

Received at Montgomery, January 8th, 1861, by telegraph from Richmond, 7th, To Gov. A. B. Moore. Legislature passed by one hundred and twelve, (112) to five, (5) to resist any attempt to coerce a seceding State by all the means in her power. What has your Convention done?-

Go out promptly and will be right.

A. F. HOPKINS,

F. M. GILMER, JR.

Mr. Davis, of Madison, moved to rescind the resolution passed on yesterday to prevent applause. The ayes and


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nays were called, and resulted-ayes 24, nays 73, and the motion was lost.

Those who voted in the affirmative, are-Baker, of Barbour, Baker, of Russell, Barnes, Beck, Blue, Catterlin, Clarke, of Marengo, Daniel, Davis, of Covington, Davis, of Madison, Dowdell, Foster, Henderson, of Macon, Henderson, of Pike, Howard, Humphries, Phillips, Rives, Williamson, Wilson, Yancey, Yelverton-24.

Those who voted in the negative are-Mr. President, Allen, Baily, Barclay, Beard, Bragg, Brasher, Bulger, Clarke, of Lawrence, Clemens, Coffey, Coleman, Coman, Crawford, Creech, Crook, Crumpler, Curtis, Dargan, Davis, of Pickens, Edwards, Ford, Forrester, Foster, Franklin, Gay, Gibbons, Gilchrist, Green, Guttery, Hawkins, Herndon, Hood, Inzer, Jemison, Jewett, Jones, of Fayette, Jones, of Lauderdale, Johnson, Kimball, Ketchum, Leonard, Lewis, Love, McClanahan, McClellan, McKinnie, Morgan, Owens, Posey, Potter, Rails, Russell, Ryan, Sanford, Sheets, Sheffield, Shortridge, Silver, Slaughter, Smith, of Henry, Smith, of Tuscaloosa, Starke, Steadham, Steele, Stone, Taylor, Timberlake, Watkins, Webb, Whatley, Whitlock, Winston, Wood-73.

A message and accompanying documents was received from his Excellency, the Governor, through his private Secretary, which were laid on the table for the present.

Mr. Yancey offered the following resolution, which was adopted.

Resolved, That, the President of the Convention appoint a committee of thirteen, to consider of and report, what action should be taken by this Convention, in order to protect and preserve the rights and liberties of the people of the State of Alabama-and that the resolutions of the general assembly, under which this Convention has assembled, be referred to that committee.

And the President appointed Messrs. Yancey, Morgan, Yelverton, Dargan, Webb, Gibbons, Clarke, of Marengo, Jemison, Kimball, Winston, Lewis, Watkins, and Clemens.

The President laid before the Convention the following dispatches:

Received at Montgomery, January 7th, 1861, by telegraph from Jackson, Miss., 7th, To Gov. A. B. Moore. A resolution has been passed to raise a committee of fifteen (15), to draft the ordinance of secession.

E. W. PETTUS.


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Received at Montgomery, January 7th, 1861, by telegraph from Jackson, 7th, To Gov. A. B. Moore. The Convention met at twelve (12). Mr. Barry is President. The State will probably secede to-morrow or next day.

E. W. PETTUS.

Received at Montgomery, January 7th, 1861, by telegraph from Tallahassee, 7th, To Gov. A. B. Moore. Convention by vote sixty-two (62), to five (5), adopted resolution in favor immediate secession. Committee appointed to prepare ordinance of secession.

E. C. BULLOCK.

Mr. Jemison introduced resolutions as follows:

Resolved 1st, That all the deliberations of this Convention shall be held with closed doors, and in secret, unless when otherwise directed by the Convention.

Resolved 2nd, That on a motion to open the doors of the Convention there shall be no debate except by consent of two-thirds of the Convention.

Resolved 3rd, That those persons invited with the bar of the Convention shall not be excluded from the secret sessions, unless so ordered by the Convention.

Resolved 4th, That an obligation of strict secrecy in regard to the secret deliberations of this Convention is imposed upon all members and persons invited within the bar, and the officers of this Convention.

Resolved 5th, That the lobby be set apart for the use of the ladies while we are in open session.

Mr. Baker, of Russell, moved to strike out the first resolution and insert the following:

Resolved, That whenever this Convention shall deem it necessary to hold a secret session it may be done on motion, and a majority vote of the Convention, and thereupon the Door-keeper shall clear the lobby and galleries-

And-

That no debate shall be had on a motion to go into secret session. Lost.

Mr. Lewis asked a division on the first resolution, and it was adopted. Ayes, 82; nays, 14.

Those who voted in the affirmative, are-Mr. President, Allen, Bailey, Baker, of Barbour, Barclay, Barnes, Beard, Beck, Bragg, Brasher, Bulger, Catterlin, Clarke, of Marengo, Clarke, of Lawrence, Clemens, Coffey, Coleman, Coman, Creech, Crook, Crumpler, Curtis, Daniel, Dargan,


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Davis, of Covington, Davis, of Madison, Davis, of Pickens, Dowdell, Earnest, Edwards, Ford, Forrester, Foster, Franklin, Gay, Gibbons, Gilchrist, Green, Guttery, Hawkins, Henderson, of Pike, Herndon, Hood, Howard, Inzer, Jemison, Jewett, Jones, of Fayette, Johnson, Kimball, Leonard, Love, McClanahan, McClellan, McPherson , McKinnie, Morgan, Owens, Phillips, Potter, Ralls, Rives, Russell, Ryan, Sheets, Sheffield, Shortridge, Silver, Slaughter, Smith, of Henry, Smith, of Tuscaloosa, Steadham, Steele, ,Stone, Taylor, Timberlake, Watts, Webb, Whitlock, Williamsom, Wilson, Winston, Wood, Yancey, Yelverton, Crawford-82.

Those who voted in the negative, are-Messrs. Baker, of Russell, Blue, Bolling, Cochran, Coman, Earnest, Foster, Henderson, of Macon, Jones, of Lauderdale, Lewis, Posey, Starke, Watkins, Whatley-14.

The remaining resolutions were then adopted. Ayes, 95; nays, 4.

Those who voted in the affirmative, are-Mr. President, Allen, Baily, Baker, of Barbour, Barclay, Barnes, Beard, Beck, Blue, Bragg, Brasher, Bulger, Catterlin, Clarke, of Marengo , Clarke, of Lawrence, Clemens, Coffey, Coleman, Coman, Crawford, Creech, Crook, Crumpler, Curtis, Daniel, Dargan, Davis, of Covington, Davis, of Madison, Davis, of Pickens, Dowdell, Earnest, Edwards, Ford, Forrester, Foster, Franklin, Gay, Gibbons, Gilchrist, Green, Guttery, Hawkins, Henderson, of Macon, Henderson, of Pike, Herndon, Hood, Howard, Mr. Humphries, Inzer, Jemison, Jewett, Jones, of Fayette, Jones, of Lauderdale, Johnson, Kimball, Ketchum, Leonard, Lewis, Love, McClanahan, McClellan, McPherson, McKinnie, Owens, Phillips, Posey, Potter, Ralls, Rives, Russell, Ryan, Sanford, Sheets, Sheffield, Shortridge, Silver, Slaughter, Smith, of Henry, Smith, of Tuscaloosa, Steadham; Steele, Stone, Taylor, Timberlake, Watkins, Watts, Webb, Whatlev, Whitlock, Williamson, Wilson, Winston, Wood, Yancey, Yelverton-95.

Those who voted in the negative, are-Messrs. Baker, of Russell, Bolling, Coman, Foster-4.

Mr. Bulger moved to suspend the operation of the resolution for the present, which was lost, and the Convention went into secret session.

SECRET SESSION.

Mr. Dargan, from the Committee on rules, made a report which was withdrawn, and


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Mr. Morgan moved that the committee be instructed to report with all possible dispatch. Adopted.

Mr. Jemison presented the affidavit of J.R. Kenan, and F. M. Welch, contestants for the seats in this Convention of Messrs. Shortridge and McClanahan, from the county of Shelby; which was ordered to lie on the table until an appropriate committee was raised to which it could be referred.

Mr. Watts presented the following dispatches:

Received at Montgomery, January 8th, 1861, by telegraph from Richmond, 8th, To Gov, A. B. Moore. Our friends here think, the immediate secession of Alabama, not postponed to future time, would exercise a favorable, perhaps controlling effect on the secession of Virginia.

F.M. GILMER, JR.,

A. F. HOPKINS.

Received at Montgomery, January 8th, 1861, by telegraph from Pensacola, To T. H. Watts. See Major Chase. Send us five hundred (500) men immediately. Let us know.

A. E. MAXWELL,

E. A. PERRY.

Received at Montgomery, January 8th, 1861, by telegraph from Mobile, January 8th, To Gov. A.B. Moore.

Shall U. S. armed vessels be permitted to enter harbor? If not, shall they be fired on, and destroyed? Specific instructions wanted-they should not enter-else the forts are no protection.

G.B. DUVAL.

Mr. Yancey moved that a committee of one be appointed to wait on the Governor and get any information he may have in relation to the Florida Forts. Adopted, and Mr. Ketchum appointed.

On motion of Mr. Watts it was ordered that the preceedings of the secret session of the Convention shall be kept in a separate book from that of the open sessions.

Mr. Ketchum, returned and reported that the Governor would make a communication as soon as it could be prepared.

On motion of Mr. Morgan, the communication on the table from His Excellency, the Governor, was taken up and read.


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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

MONTGOMERY, ALA., January 8th, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Convention:

In obedience to the resolution adopted by the Convention on yesterday, requesting me to communicate any information I may have respecting .the condition of the country; I herewith transmit such information as is in my possession, touching the public interests and a brief statement of my acts in regard thereto, and the reasons therefore. All of which are respectfully submitted to the consideration of the Convention.

Very Respectfully,

A B. MOORE.

The General Assembly at its last session passed unanimously, with two exceptions, resolutions requiring the Governor in the event of the election of a Black Republican to order elections to be held for delegates to a Convention of the State. The contingency contemplated having occurred, making it necessary for me to call a Convention; writs of election were issued immediately after the votes of the electoral college were cast. It was my opinion, that under the peculiar phraseology of the resolutions I was not authorized to order elections upon the casting of the popular vote. I therefore determined not to do so.

As the slaveholding States have a common interest in the institution of slavery, and must be common suffererers in its overthrow. I deemed it proper, and it appeared to be the general sentiment of the people, that Alabama should consult and advise with the other slaveholding State, so far as practicable, as to what is best to be done to protect their interest and honor in the impending crisis. And seeing that the Conventions of South Carolina and Florida would probably act before the Convention of Alabama assembled, and that the Legislatures of some of the States would meet and might adjourn without calling Conventions, prior to the meeting of our Convention, and thus the opportunity of conferring with them upon the great and vital question, on which you are called to act. I determined to appoint Commissioners to all the slaveholding States. After appointing them to those States, whose Conventions and Legislatures were to meet in advance of the Alabama Convention, it was suggested by wise counsellors that if I did not make similar appointments to the other Southern States, it might seem to be making in-


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vidions distinction, which was not intended. Being convinced that it might be so considered, I then determined to appoint Commissioners to all the slaveholding States, and made the following appointments.

A.T. Hopkins and T. M. Gilmer, Commissioner to Virginia.

John A. Elmore, Commissioner to South Carolina.

J. W. Garrott and Robert H. Smith, Commissioners to North Carolina.

J. L. M. Curry, Commissioner to Maryland.

David Clopton, Commissioner to Delaware.

S. T. Hale, Commissioner to Kentucky.

William Cooper, Commissioner to Missouri.

L. P. Walker, Commissioner to Tennessee.

David Aubbard Commissioner to Arkansas.

John A. Winston, Commissioner to Louisiana.

J. M. Calhoun, Commissioner to Texas.

E. C. Bullock, Commissioner to Florida,

John Gill Shorter, Commissioner to Georgia.

E. W. Pettus, Commissioner to Mississippi.

All these gentlemen are well known to the people of Alabama, and are distinguished for their ability, integrity and patriotism. The following is a copy of the Commission to each of them in substance.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

MONTGOMERY, ALA., December, 1860.

Whereas, the election of Abraham Lincoln, a Black Republican to the Presidency of the United States by a purely sectional vote, and by a party whose leading and publicly avowed object is the destruction of the institution of slavery as it exists in the slaveholding States, is an accomplished fact. And whereas, the success of said party, and the power which it now has, and soon will acquire greatly endanger the peace, interest, security and honor of the slaveholding States, and make it necessary that prompt and effective measures should be adopted to avoid the evils which must result from a Republican Administration of the Federal Government; and as the interests and destiny of the slaveholding States are the same, they must naturally sympathize with each other; they therefore so far as may be practicable, should consult and advise together as to what is the best to be done to protect their mutual interest and honor. 


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Now therefore, in consideration, of the premises, I Andrew B. Moore, Governor of the State of Alabama, by virtue of the general powers in me vested, do hereby constitute and appoint Col. John A. Elmore, a citizen of said State, a Commissioner to the sovereign State of South Carolina to consult and advise with His Excellency Gov. Wm. H. Gist, and the members of the Convention to be assembled in said State on the 17th day of December, inst., as to what is best to be done to protect the rights, interests and honor of the slaveholding States, and to report the result of such consultation in time to enable me to communicate the same to the Convention of the State of Alabama to be held on the 7th day of January next.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto signed my name and caused the Great Seal of the State to be affixed in the city of Montgomery, this day of December, A. D., 1860.

A. B. MOORE.

I herewith transmit to you the reports, so far as they have been received, and will lay before the Convention any others that may be made immediately on their receipt. I trust that my course in the appointment of these commissioners will meet the approbation of the Convention.

Having satisfactory reason to believe that Alabama would withdraw from the present Union, I considered it my duty to take such steps as should enable the Convention and Legislature to provide the means of putting the State in a condition to protect and defend her citizens, in the event of her secession.

Knowing that the Treasury was not provided with funds sufficient for the purpose-that bonds at such a crisis could not be sold out of the State, except at a great sacrifice, and believing that at such a time, additional taxation upon the people should be avoided, if possible. I determined to take the responsibility of requesting the banks to suspend specie payments, for the purpose of retaining their specie to aid the State, provided it should become necessary. With this view, I addressed a letter to each of the banks, a copy of which will be found in the following address to the people of Alabama, publish on the, day of December 1860. I refer the Convention to this address for a full statement of the reasons which induced my action in this matter.


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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

MONTGOMERY ALA., 17th December, 1860.

To the People of Alabama:

Strong appeals have been made to me by many citizens from different sections of the State, to convene the Legislature for the purpose of providing the ways and means of protecting the interests and honor of the State in the impending crisis, and for the further purpose of authorizing the banks to suspend specie payments, to enable them to furnish greater facilities for moving the cotton crop, and thus relieve, to some extent, the embarrassed condition of the cotton market and the people. These appeals were made by those whose opinions are entitled to the highest respect, and are disconnected with the banks, either as directors or stockholders. After giving to the subject the fullest consideration, and viewing it in all its bearings, I determined not to convene the Legislature for reasons which I will now give.

I did not doubt, and do not now, that the Convention to meet on the 7th January, will determine that Alabama shall withdraw from the present Union at an early day.

Should this contingency occur, it will be necessary forthwith, to convene the Legislature to provide for whatever the action of the Convention may render necessary in the way of legislation. The imposition upon the State of the expense of the Convention, and two extra sessions of the Legislature at this time, when economy is a matter of the highest consideration, ought to be avoided if it could be done consistently with the public interests. If the Legislature could anticipate the action of the convention and provide for it, it would supersede the necessity of convening after the convention shall have acted; but this would be impossible.

It was my opinion that if I issued a proclamation calling an extra session of the Legislature, every one would believe that the object in part, was to authorize the banks to suspend specie payments. This would have caused an immediate run upon them, and would in a great measure have exhausted their specie, and thus rendered them unable to aid the State in her emergency or relieve the people.

It appeared to me that these difficulties could be avoided, by the banks and myself assuming responsibilities, which never should be done under any other circumstances.


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I considered it a matter of the utmost importance that the specie in the vaults of the banks, should be kept there, so far as it could be done, in order to aid the state in providing the means to sustain herself in the approaching crisis. It would be inexpedient at such a time, to tax the people, and State bonds could not now be sold except at a great sacrifice. I considered it the duty of banks upon whom extraordinary privileges had been conferred, to come to the aid of the State in her hour of need, and therefore determined to request them at the same time to suspend specie payments, and retain their specie for the benefit and security of the State, so far as might be necessary.

In this way, a run upon the banks would be avoided, and they would remain in a condition to relieve the State from immediately taxing her people, or selling bonds at a heavy discount; and render unnecessary an extra session of the Legislature, before the meeting of the Convention.

The extension of relief to the people, in selling their cotton crops, would follow as an incident. In consideration of the premises I addressed to each of the banks a letter of which the following is a copy.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

MONTGOMERY, ALA., December 4th, 1860,

To the President and Directors of the Central Bank of Alabama.

MONTGOMERY, ALA.

Gentlemen:

The peculiar and extraordinary state of public affairs and the interest of the State, make it a matter of State necessity to retain in the vaults of the banks all the gold and silver in their possession.

From present prospects, there can scarcely be a doubt that Alabama will secede from the Union before the 4th day of March next. Should that contingency occur, it will be necessary for the State to raise not less than a million of dollars in specie, or its equivalent. Under the circumstances, which surround us, we could not sell State bonds, either in the North or in Europe, except at a ruinous discount; and it would be inexpedient to tax the peoples immediately for that purpose. How then can the State secure the money that may be necessary in her emergency?

But one practicable plan now presents itself to my mind,


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and that is to call upon the banks of the state to come up to her aid. The course of events and the suspension of the South Carolina, and Georgia Banks, will create more or less uneasiness in the minds of bill holders, and will induce many of them to draw the specie from the banks to the extent of the notes they may hold, and thus render the banks unable to aid the State, as they otherwise could do.

I am strongly urged from various parts of the State to convene the Legislature for the purpose of authorizing the banks to suspend specie payments, and thus enable them to retain their specie for the purposes suggested.

I have reflected much and anxiously upon the subject. I am satisfied were I to convene the Legislature for the purpose stated, that it would produce a run on the banks, and in a great measure exhaust their specie and defeat the object I have in view.

With the view then, of enabling the Banks to retain their specie for the purpose aforesaid, I deem it my duty, under the circumstances, to advise and request them to suspend, all at the same time.

The high and patriotic motives which would induce the act, would sustain the banks and me. There can be no doubt that the Convention and Legislature soon to meet will sustain and legalize the act. I will sanction it, and will institute no proceedings against them, and in my message to the Legislature and Convention will urge them to sanction the act, which I am sure they will do. If need be, after the suspension, I will write an address to the people of the State, stating the facts and circumstances under which the step was taken. I am satisfied that the banks are in a sound condition and can maintain it through the present crisis; but it will render them unable to give the State that aid she will need.

I have written similar letters to all the banks. The contents of this communication are respectfully submitted for your consideration.

Very Respectfully,

Your obedient servant.

A. B. MOORE.

At my suggestion and request, and for the purposes stated in my letter, the Commercial Bank at Selma, the Central Bank at Montgomery and the Eastern Bank at Eufaula suspends this day. It is due to those Banks that I should say (being advised of their condition) that they are


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able to sustain themselves through the crisis, and that they have taken this important step with the high and patriotic motive of sustaining the State, as shown by the response of each of them to my letter. Their letters are filed in my office, and would have been published but for the length they would give this communication.

There is no necessity for any depreciation of their notes as there can be no question of their solvency.

The circumstances under which they leave suspended should relieve them from any censure. If censure is to fall upon any one it should be upon me, and I rely for my justification upon the manifest propriety and necessity of the act as well as the motives which induced it. The Bank of Mobile, and the Southern Bank of Alabama decline to suspend, but patriotically pledge themselves to raise their proportion of the amount, suggested in my letter, should there be a necessity for it. These two banks being located in Mobile, can procure specie and exchange with more facility than the banks in the interior, and are not so liable to be prejudiced by the suspended banks of South Carolina and Georgia. Hence their ability to aid the State without suspending specie payments.

The Northern Bank at Huntsville also declines to suspend on account of peculiar circumstances which surround it.

I have now briefly stated the circumstances and facts, connected with the suspension of three of our banks, in accordance with the promise contained in my letter, and hope they will be satisfactory to the enlightened and patriotic people of Alabama, for whose benefit this great responsibility has been assumed.

A.B. MOORE.

I am authorized to say that the Banks are prepared to loan the State their proportionate share of one million dollars; should her necessities require it.

The Convention is aware that I have had Fort Morgan, Fort Gaines and Mount Vernon occupied by the troops of Alabama. My reasons for this important step are briefly and plainly set forth in the following letter addressed to the President of the United States, as soon as I was officially informed that the Forts and Arsenal had been occupied.


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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

MONTGOMERY, ALA., January 4th, 1861.

To His Excellency James Buchanan, President of the United States.

Sir:-In a spirit of frankness, I hasten to inform you by letter that by my order Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines and the United States Arsenal at Mount Vernon were on yesterday peaceably occupied, and are now held by the troops of the State of Alabama. That this act on my part may not be misunderstood by the Government of the United States, I proceed to state the motives which have induced it and the reasons, which justify it, and also the course of conduct with which I design to follow that act.

A Convention of the People of this State will, in pursuance of a previously enacted law, assemble on the 7th inst. I was fully convinced by the evidences which I had, that convention would at an early day, in the exercise of an authority which in my judgement of right belongs to it, withdraw the State of Alabama from the Government of the United States, and place it in the attitude of a separate and independent power. Being thus convinced I deemed it my duty, to take every precautionary step to make the secession of the State peaceful, and prevent detriment to her people. While entertaining such a conviction as to my duty, I received such information as left but little if any room to doubt, that the Government of the United States, anticipating secession of Alabama and preparing to maintain its authority within this State by force, even to the shedding of the blood and the sacrifice of the lives of the people, was about to reinforce those forts, and put a guard over the Arsenal. Having that information, it was but an act of self-defence, and the plainest dictate of prudence to anticipate and guard against the contemplated movement of the authorities of the General Government. Appreciating, as I am sure you do, the courage and spirit of our people, you must be sensible that no attempt at the coercion of the State, or at the enforcement by military power of the authority of the United States within its jurisdiction, in contravention of the Ordinance of secession can be effectual, unless our utmost capacity for resistance can be exhausted. It would have been an unwise policy, suicidal in its character to have permitted the Government of the United States to


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have made undisturbed preparations within this State, to enforce, by war and bloodshed, an authority which it is the fixed purpose of the people of the State to resist to the uttermost of their power. A policy so manifestly unwise, would probably have been overruled by an excited and discontented people, and popular violence might have accomplished that, which has been done by the State much more appropriately and much more consistently with the prospect of peace, and the interest of the parties concerned.

The purpose with which my order was given and has been executed was to avoid and not to provoke hostilities between the State and Federal Government. There is no object save the honor and independence of my State, which is by me so ardently desired as the preservation of amicable relations between this State and the Government of the United States. That the secession of the State, made necessary by the conduct of others, may be peaceful is my prayer as well as the prayer of every patriotic man in the State.

All inventory of the property in the forts and Arsenal has been ordered, and the strictest care will be taken to prevent the injury or destruction of it, while peaceable relations continue to subsist, as I trust they will. The forts and Arsenal will be held by my order only for the precautionary purpose for which they were taken, and subject to the control of the Convention of the people to assemble on the 7th inst.

With distinguished consideration,

I am your obedient servant,

A.B. MOORE.

The Forts and Arsenal will be held subject to such instructions and directions as the Convention may think proper to give. Strict orders have been given the officers in command at the places mentioned to take an inventory of the arms and ammunitions and public stores and see that all are protected and preserved.

I am fully aware that all I have done in regard to the matters herein communicated, I have taken great responsibilities. For my justification, I rely upon the propriety and necessity of the course I have taken, and upon the wisdom and patriotism of the Convention and people of Alabama. In this great and trying crisis, I have done


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all I could do to prepare the State for any emergency that might occur. The great and responsible duty of protecting the rights, interests and honor of Alabama is now imposed on the Convention; and I do not doubt that her present proud and high position will be maintained. May the God of Wisdom and justice guide you in your counsels.

Mr. Clemens moved that the communication and accompanying reports be printed, which was laid on the table temporarily.

On motion of Mr. Yancey, it was resolved that the State Printer shall be the Printer of this Convention on the same terms he receives as State Printer, and that he shall be sworn to secrecy.

Mr. Cochran introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That the Governor of this State is requested and authorized to take such steps and adopt such measures as, in his judgement, may be necessary to protect the interests of the people of Alabama; and that his actions in taking temporary possession of the forts and arsenal within the borders of Alabama is approved.

Resolved 2d, That to enable the Governor to carry out the objects of the preceeding resolution, the sum of ten thousand dollars is hereby appropriated and placed at his disposal.

Mr. Yancey moved to strike out all after the word “Resolved,” and insert,

That the Governor be instructed to accept the service of five hundred volunteers, to be placed under orders of the Governor of Florida, with a view to the taking possession of the forts a t Pensacola, for the purpose of protecting the State of Alabama from invasion and coercion, during the deliberations of this Convention upon the question of resuming the sovereign powers of the people of Alabama; and that for this purpose ten thousand dollars be appropriated out of funds in the Treasury.

The amendment was accepted, as also the following amendment offered by Mr. Dargan:

Resolved, That the citizens of this State who have volunteered for the defence thereof, or who may volunteer as soldiers under the authority of our sister slaveholding States, for their defence against any hostile or coercing power, shall be protected by the power of this State against any proceeding which may be instituted against them by the Government of the United States on that account.


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Mr. Kimball moved to refer the resolutions to the committee of thirteen.

During the pending of this motion, a communication was received from the Governor, which was read and ordered to lie on the table for the present:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, 8th January, 1861.

Hon. William M. Brooks, President of the Convention of the State of Alabama:

In reply to a verbal communication from the body over which you preside, made by one of its members, I make the following statement. My information in regard to Pensacola is that Governor Perry, of Florida, has informed me by dispatch that he has ordered the forts to be occupied by the troops of Florida, and asks aid from Alabama.

The force at his command in West Florida is small, and not sufficient to take and maintain the forts. Troops from Alabama could reach that point before the troops of East and Middle Florida. This fact, with the importance of the position to Alabama as well as to Florida, induces him to make the request, as I am informed. It is believed at Washington, in South Carolina and Georgia, as I am advised from high sources, that it is not only the policy of the Federal Government to coerce the seceding States, but as soon as possible to put herself in position by reinforcing all the forts in the States where secession is expected. I need not suggest the danger to Florida and Alabama that must result from permitting a strong force to get possession of these forts.

With sentiments of high consideration and respect,

A.B. MOORE.

On motion of Mr. Yancey, the Door keeper was authorized to procure an assistant, to secure the doors until fastenings can be procured.

Mr. Morgan moved to amend Mr. Kimball’s motion, and refer the resolution to a committee of five. Withdrawn.

Mr. Smith, of Tuscaloosa, moved to adjourn, but withdrew the motion at the request of Mr. Jemison, and the subject before the House was temporarily postponed to enable Mr. Jemison to offer the following resolutions, which were adopted:

Resolved, That the Secretary be authorized to procure the services of a competent person as Recording Secretary, who shall also act as Engrossing Clerk.


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Resolved, That the regular hour of meeting of this Convention shall be 11 o’clock, a.m., until otherwise ordered.

Mr. Edwards moved to adjourn. Lost.

Mr. Watts moved to amend Mr. Kimball’s motion, and refer the resolutions to a committee of seven, to report at 8 o’clock this evening.

Mr. Whitlock moved to adjourn until 11 o’clock to-morrow. Lost.

Mr. Watts asked leave to withdraw his motion to refer to a committee of seven. Objection was made, and,

Mr. Cochran moved that Mr. Watts have leave to withdraw his motion. Granted, and the motion was withdrawn.

Mr. Kimball withdrew his motion, but afterwards renewed it, and it was lost.

The question recurring on the adoption of the resolutions,

Mr. Morgan called for a division, and the first resolution was passed by a vote of ayes 52; nays 47.

Those who voted in the affirmative are:-Mr. President, Baily, Baker, of Barbour, Baker, of Russell, Barnes, Beck, Blue, Bolling, Bragg, Chatterlin, Clark., of Marengo, Cochran, Coleman, Creech, Crook, Curtis, Daniel, Dargan, Davis, of Covington, Davis, of Pickins, Dowdell, Gibbons, Gilchrist, Hawkins, Henderson., of Macon, Henderson, of Pike, Herndon, Howard, Humphries, Jemison, Jewett, Ketchum, Love, McClanahan, McPherson, McKinnie, Morgan, Owens, Phillips, Ralls, Rives, Ryan, Shortridge, Silver, Smith, of Henry, Starke, Stone, Watts, Webb, Whatley, Williamson, Yancey, Yelverton-52.

Those who voted in the negative are:-Messrs. Allen, Barclay, Beard, Brasher, Bulger, Clark, of Lawrence, Clemens, Coffey, Coman, Crawford, Crumpler, Davis, of Madison, Edwards, Ford, Forrester, Foster, Franklin, Gay, Green, Guttery, Hood, Inzer, Jones, of Fayette, Jones, of Lauderdale, Johnson, Kimball, Leonard, Lewis, McClellan, Posey, Potter, Russell, Stanford, Sheets, Sheffield, Slaughter, Smith, of Tuscaloosa, Steadham, Steele, Taylor, Timberlake, Watkins, Whitlock, Wilson, Winston, Wood-47.

And the resolution vas ordered to be engrossed by the Secretary and sent forthwith to the Governor.

On motion by Mr. Jemison, the second resolution was ordered to be referred to a committee of five, to be appointed by the President.

And the Convention adjourned till 10 o’clock to-morrow.


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