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Monday, November 20, 1820.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Mr. Hodges, agreeably to notice, asked and obtained leave to bring in a bill to be entitled an act authorising a review of Flint river; which was read the first time and on motion, Ordered, That said bill be read a second time on to-morrow.

On motion of Mr. Herbert the following resolution was adopted:

Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to prepare and bring in a bill to alter and amend the Constitution of this state, so that each county shall have a Senator and at least one Representative; whereupon Messrs. Herbert, Sims and Gause were appointed.

Mr. Casey gave notice that on to-morrow he would ask for leave to bring in a bill to be entitled an act permitting Merchants, Shopkeepers, Traders, Physicians and Apothecaries to prove their books of accounts; also

A bill to be entitled an act to afford a summary relief to persons purchasing lands of the United States.

Received a Message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Chapman.

Mr. President, -The House of Representatives have passed a bill to be entitled an act to authorise Lemuel Mead to emancipate a negro man slave, named Richmond; also

A bill to be entitled an act to authorise Daniel Reed to emancipate certain slaves therein named, to which they desire your concurrence.

Which bills were severally read the first time; and, on motion, ordered to be read a second time on to-morrow.

Mr. Ringgold, agreeably to notice, asked for and obtained leave to bring in a bill to provide for fixing the permanent Seat of Justice for the county of Marengo, and for other purposes therein mentioned; which was read the first time. On motion, Ordered, That said bill be read a second time on to-morrow.

Mr. Gaines presented the petition of a number of citizens of Jackson county, praying that Mary King may be permitted to retail spirituous liquors without paying for license.

On motion of Mr. Gaines, Ordered, That said petition be referred to the Committee on Propositions and Grievances.

According to the order of the day the bill declaring the Oaktuppa Creek a navigable stream, was read the second time.

On motion of Mr. Trotter,  Ordered, That said bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole, and made the order of the day on to-morrow.

A Message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Weedon.

Mr. President The House of Representatives have passed the following bills: to wit.

An act to authorise John N. S. Jones, and Alexander P. Jones to emancipate certain slaves therein named. An act to authorise Killis Walton to emancipate a negro man slave, named Tom. An act to authorise Gilbery D. Taylor to emancipate certain slaves therein named. An act to change the names of and legitimate certain persons


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therein named; and An act to incorporate the town of Selma, in the County of Dallas. To which they desire your concurrence.

On motion of Mr. Garth the Senate resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, on the bill to establish a public road from the southern boundary line of township eight, in range four or five, west of the basis meridian of Huntsville to the Falls of Tuscaloosa, Mr. Casey in the chair; and after some time spent therein, the Committee rose, Mr. President resumed the chair, and Mr. Casey reported that the Committee of the Whole had, according to order, had said bill under consideration, and had made sundry amendments thereto, which were concurred in.

Mr. Casey moved further to amend said bill by striking out in the fourth section the words "two thousand," for the purpose of inserting in lieu thereof the words "three thousand." And the question being put, it passed in the negative.

On motion of Mr. Garth said bill was then read as amended and ordered to be engrossed for a third reading on to-morrow.

Mr. Chambers, agreeably to notice, asked and obtained leave to bring in a bill to be entitled an act to amend an act to alter and amend an act regulating Hawkers and Pedlars; which was read the first time.

On motion of Mr. Chambers, Ordered, That said bill be read a second time on to-morrow.

On motion of Mr. Farmer, Resolved, That a Committee be appointed on the part of the Senate to act with such Committee as may be appointed on the part of the House of Representatives, to take into consideration the propriety of providing for the safe keeping of the records and papers belonging and appertaining to the Legislature of the State of Alabama; and that said Committee have leave to report by bill or otherwise: whereupon Messrs. Farmer, Gaines, and Herbert were appointed on the part of the Senate.

Ordered, That a Message be sent to the House of Representatives informing them thereof, and desiring their concurrence.

The bill entitled an act to amend an act passed at Huntsville on the 16th December, 1819, entitled an act to alter and amend the laws regulating the admission and practice of Counsellors and Attornies at law was read a second time.

On motion, Ordered, That said bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole, and made the order of the day on to-morrow.

Mr. Rose moved, that the Senate adjourn until to-morrow morning , ten o'clock.

And the question being taken thereupon, it passed in the negative.

Mr. Casey then called for the orders of the day.

And according to order the Senate resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, on the bill to be entitled an act to provide for the public printing, and for other purposes, Mr. Garth in the chair; and after some time spent therein, the Committee rose, Mr. President resumed the chair, and Mr. Garth reported that the Committee of the Whole had, according to order, had said bill under considera-


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tion; but not having time to go through with the same, had directed him to report progress and ask leave to sit again, which was granted.

Mr. Terrel, agreeably to notice, asked for, and obtained leave to bring in a bill to be entitled an act authorising a Lottery for the benefit of the navigation of Buttahatchee river; which was read the first time.

On motion of Mr. Terrel, Ordered, That said bill be read a second time on to-morrow.

Mr. Gaines, agreeably to notice, asked for and obtained leave to bring in a bill to be entitled an act to amend an act passed last session of the General Assembly, to provide two additional election precincts in the County of Jackson; which was read the first time.

On motion of Mr. Rose Ordered, That said bill be read a second time on to-morrow.

Mr. Terrel from the Committee to whom was referred the drafting a Memorial to the general government, on the subject of a repeal of the law restricting the taxation of certain lands, and for other purposes, asked for and obtained leave to report the following draft:

The General Assembly of the State of Alabama to the Congress of the United States respectfully represent.

That by an act of the general government enabling the people of the Alabama Territory to form a Constitution and state government and for the admission of such state into the Union on an equal footing with the original states, it is declared, that each and every tract of land, sold by the United States after the first day of September next following the enactment of the recited law, shall be and remain exempt from any tax laid by the order or under the authority of this state, whether for state, county, township, parish or any other purpose whatsoever, for the term of five years from and after the respective days of the sales thereof. The situation of the United States lands, anterior to the abolition of the law, which at that day controlled its sales, at once evinced the policy of the restrictive measure. The law under which the Government lands are now sold, goes at once to destroy the reason upon which this law was predicated, and seems strongly to indicate a repeal of the restriction.

In the same law it is also declared that all navigable waters within the State of Alabama shall for ever remain public highways, free to the citizens at this state and of the United States, without any tax, duty, impost, or toll therefor, imposed by this state. To this section of the law the Convention of Alabama conceived a cause of regret but which at that moment was deemed irremediable. The soundest reflection which can be afforded on the relations of this country induces a belief, that to navigate a portion of our rivers by means out of which tolls will follow, will be the best policy; and it being impossible for your memorialists to conceive the point of injury to the United States, pray the abolition of this restriction also, with the condition that no tax, duty, impost or toll, shall ever be imposed on


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any citizen of the United States, other than those imposed on the citizens of the State of Alabama.

Which was read the first time, and ordered for a second reading to-morrow.

The Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning ten o'clock.